Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) Turns Down Bats Made Of Bamboo; Deems It Illegal

Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) Turns Down Bats Made Of Bamboo; Deems It Illegal

Cricket, Bat and ball, Cricket Bats
Cricket

The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) has pinned down the idea of using bats made from bamboo after a study from Cambridge University revealed its benefits. The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) has shot down the possibility until further discussion, mainly because of its illegality under the current set of guidelines governing the sport. The cricket bats used currently are made of wood.

According to a study by Darshil Shah and Ben Tinkler-Davies from the University of Cambridge, bats made of bamboo have a greater sweet spot, making it comfortable to hit fours even off a yorker. The researchers also found the bat to be “stiffer, harder and stronger than those made of willow, although more brittle, facilitating more sustainability.

Steve Smith
Steve Smith (Image Credit: Twitter)

The Marylebone Cricket Club said in a statement that as the guardian of the laws of the game, they have to maintain the balance between the bat and ball. Hence, any amendment needs due consideration, especially concerning the bat producing greater power.

“MCC’s role as Guardian of the Laws includes maintaining the balance between bat and ball, and any potential amendments to the Law would need to carefully take this into consideration, particularly the concept of the bat producing greater power,” MCC stated as quoted by The Hindu.

The Club will discuss the topic at the next laws sub-committee meeting: MCC

Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) Turns Down Bats Made Of Bamboo; Deems It Illegal
MCC President Kumar Sangakkara. (Credits: Twitter)

Simultaneously, the MCC also underlined that sustainability is a topic for them and this angle of alternatives is worth looking into. The association vowed to discuss the issue in their next laws sub-committee meeting.

“Sustainability is a relevant topic for MCC and indeed cricket, and this angle of willow alternatives should also be considered. This could provide a pertinent angle for further research and the possibility of reducing the cost of producing bats in different areas of the world. The Club will discuss the topic at the next laws sub-committee meeting,” it stated further.

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