The Indian Under-19 team has reached the final of the World Cup, and one of their best players has been their middle-order batsman, Shubman Gill who has been in outstanding form and almost single-handedly won the semi-final match for India against arch-rivals Pakistan.

Gill scored an unbeaten century in the semi-final clash against Pakistan to guide India to the final of the tournament. 

Abdul Razzaq, Pakistan, ICC U19 World Cup 2018, New Zealand, India U19, Shubman Gill
India U19 rode on the magnificent hundred of Shubman Gill, Abdul Razzaq believes management should admit fault. Photo Credit: Getty Images.

Gill had scored 341 runs in four innings at an average of 170. The right-handed batsman who hails from Punjab is one of the most promising batsmen in youth cricket.

Indian fans have a lot of hopes lying on Gill’s shoulders going into the final of the World Cup. Both India and Australia have been the two of the most successful teams at the Under-19 level since the tournament began in 1988.

Australia won the inaugural tournament in 1988 on their home soil. Australia then went on to win it in 2002 and 2010.

Shubman Gill, 100 Average, Youth ODI Cricket, India U19, 2018 U19 World Cup, New Zealand
Shubman Gill struck his maiden hundred in style. Photo Credit: Getty Images.

India, on the other hand, had won the tournament thrice; in 2000, 2008 and 2012.

Shubman Gill
Shubman Gill has revealed the red handkerchief as his lucky charm. Photo Credit: Getty Images.

However, coming into the final of the tournament Gill has revealed the red handkerchief on his waist as his lucky charm. Gill said,

“I’ve had it from the beginning. I used to have a white one. But then in one game, a U-16 match, I changed it to red and scored runs, I scored a century. After that, I have had it for three-four years.”  

Steve Waugh
Steve Waugh wipes away perspiration with his red rag. (Photo by Mark Dadswell/Getty Images)

One of the greatest batsmen and captain ever to have played the game, Steve Waugh also had a similar lucky charm. Waugh kept a red cloth in his pocket while batting.

The practice began in Leeds in England 1993 when he used it to wipe away sweat while batting. Waugh went on to score 157 in that innings and then supported the regime until his retirement in 2004.

Here’s the news feed –

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Shubman Gill to Finish Youth ODI career with 100 plus average