In a shocking announcement, Pakistan’s talisman fast bowler Mohammad Amir has decided to call time on his Test career at the age of just 27 years. Amir had decided to hang his boots from the red ball version in order to concentrate more on the limited-overs format of the game. The southpaw seamer had a great outing for Pakistan in the recently concluded World Cup.

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The southpaw seamer took 17 wickets in the eight matches of the World Cup. Thus, he was Pakistan’s leading wicket-taker in the ODI showpiece. The gun fast bowler scalped 119 wickets in the 36 Test matches for Pakistan. He bowled with an average of 30.48 in the longest format of the game.

Mohammad Amir
Mohammad Amir. Credit: Getty Images

It is a shocking decision.

On the other hand, Amir made his Test debut against Sri Lanka in 2009. Amir had a fine start to his Test career as he scalped six wickets at Galle. However, his efforts went in vain as Pakistan lost that match by 50 runs.

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The southpaw seamer took four five-wicket hauls in his Test career and his best bowling figures of 6-44 came against West Indies in April 2017 at Kingston in Jamaica.

“It has been an honour to represent Pakistan in the pinnacle and traditional format of the game. I, however, have decided to move away from the longer version so I can concentrate on white ball cricket,” Amir said in a release.

Amir added the next year T20I World Cup is at the top of his priority.

Amir
Mohammad Amir. Credits: AP

“Playing for Pakistan remains my ultimate desire and objective, and I will try my best to be in th

e best physical shape to contribute in the team’s upcoming challenges, including next year’s ICC T20 World Cup,” Amir added.

It is a disappointment for the game that Amir has decided to move away from the Test format. He is a fantastic bowler who is still at his prime and has a lot of time in his career.

Here is how Twitter reacted to his retirement: