Premier India spinner Ravichandran Ashwin changed his twitter name on Tuesday to send a strong message amid the growing coronavirus concern. The novel coronavirus pandemic, which first broke out in Wuhan, China, has effected lives of people across the globe. The death toll has increased to over 16,000 by Tuesday morning.

In India, 499 people have been tested positive with coronavirus, claiming lives of at least eight people.

‘Lets stay indoors India’

Ravichandran Ashwin
Ravichandran Ashwin (Credits: Twitter)

To withstand the novel coronavirus pandemic it is important to stay home and keep ourselves self-isolated. During this time, Ashwin sent a strong message on social media, by changing his name to ‘lets stay indoors India’. In the wake of novel coronavirus pandemic, it comes as an awareness for people around the globle.

With Ashwin being one of the role models in the country, it might work as an effective way for people to take precautions. However, a survey suggests, Indians are among the least worried about the pandemic.

Along side Ashwin, even India captain Virat Kohli and others from the cricket fraternity have urged people to stay indoors.

The novel coronavirus has forced major sporting events to be called off or re-scheduled. India’s last series against South Africa at home will be re-scheduled after the first match was washed out. The Pakistan Super League (PSL) was called off while the IPL 2020 was differed to April 15.

Latest in the list, the Olympics 2020 will be postponed, veteran IOC member Dick Pound told USA today.

What is coronavirus and how does it effects?

ICC, BCCI, Anil Kumble
India fans (Credits: Twitter)

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Most people infected with the COVID-19 virus will experience mild to moderate respiratory illness and recover without requiring special treatment.  Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer are more likely to develop serious illness.